Jessie Veeder

Sounds like dirt roads and dust, wind and wheat fields, hope and home...

Jessie Nashville studio release and fourth original album "Northern Lights" is available now! 

"This new album is Americana magic...Yes, Veeder is a fine, exuberant singer. Yes, she writes tuneful melodies. Though more significantly, it’s her realness that bolsters her musical talent. What’s most impressive about Veeder is her remarkable ability to express her true character and life experiences through song. She can write meaningful lyrics, craft appealing music and express herself openly and then have these elements converge in the most beautiful way. “Northern Lights” is proof of this."-High Plains Reader

"Jessie is one of the most intuitive and instinctual artists I have ever worked with. She’s prolific. And her songs are great.” -David Swenson, Makoche Studios

Jessie Veeder has been a symbol of folk music in the badlands of Western North Dakota since she released her first original album, This Road,  when she was only sixteen years old. It was an effort that sparked the interest of music enthusiasts and took her from performing at fairs and festivals around her home state to managing a national college and coffeehouse tour and recording her fifth original album in Nashville in 2015.  

Jessie's successful career in the music industry started with her singing alongside her folk musician father when she was only ten years old, belting out tunes by Nancy Griffith, EmmyLou Harris, John Prine and Bruce Springsteen, artists who helped hone her love for folk music. And soon she began writing her own, penning and recording her first original album when she was only 16, a body of work that landed her a job traveling the country with a booking agency out of Nashville. From there she recorded her second original album A Place to Belong with the Fargo-based label Barking Dog Records in 2005 before bringing it all home to record and release Jessie Veeder Live in 2010 and then Nothing’s Forever, a 2012 effort that features Jessie’s renowned single Boomtown, an homage to the people working to make a living in oil country and a song that put Veeder in the spotlight as a feature in various news programs and national and international documentaries.

Jessie’s most recent release, Northern Lights, 2015, brought her to Nashville to record with Bill Warner, a producer who has worked with artists such as Garth Brooks, Dolly Parton, Mindy Smith and Trisha Yearwood, among others. Backed by some of the best players in the industry, Jessie's skill as a heart wrenching songwriter soars in the new songs that remain rooted in the stories of the people and landscape of her home in Western North Dakota. The highly anticipated release is some of Jessie's best work yet.

“It was such an amazing experience to bring the songs I wrote in my living room or while working on the ranch to Nashville to see how they might transform in the hands of some of the best studio players around,” said Veeder of her experience in Music City. “And they just got it. They understood where the music needed to go, respected the stories and made these songs come to life in the most beautiful way.”

The 12 track album blends rootsy instruments, poignant lyrics and powerful melodies rooted in Americana, blues, folk and country influences. Veeder, who is known for bringing musicians together from across the state, has spent the last year playing with Dickinson, ND based band Outlaw Sippin’ as well as maintaining her solo and acoustic appearances. She credits the band with influencing the more driving tracks on the album. She also appears with members of Bismarck’s Frog Holler String Band.

But beyond the music it’s Veeder’s story that has gained her a global following. Her popular website “Meanwhile, back at the ranch…” chronicles life on the Veeder Ranch and the success of her website has landed her a job as a weekly columnist for Forum Communications and newspapers across the state and as a commentator on Prairie Public Radio. 

Jessie has been a featured artist at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko Nevada and was a main stage act Red Ants Pants Music Festival. She was recently named North Dakota's Favorite Folk Artist and is a recent recipient  of the North Dakota Ambassador Award. Jessie has shared the stage with Dan Seals, Bobby Vee, Black Hawk, Sammy Kershaw, Corb Lund, Joe Diffie, The Wilkensons, Brenn Hill, Martha Scanlan, Keri Noble, Gwen Sebastian and Kat Perkins among others. 

“Jessie tells the story of us,” said David Swenson of Makoche Studios out of Bismarck who worked with Jessie to produce her 2012 release Nothing's Forever, an album that he describes as one of the best to come out of their studio. “Jessie is one of the most intuitive and instinctual artists I have ever worked with. She’s prolific. And her songs are great.”

With unique and interestingly beautiful vocals, Veeder’s lyrics swell with references to her own life experiences growing up on a working cattle ranch in the rugged land of Western North Dakota. Veeder’s ability to captivate audiences with stories of her love for the landscape, the culture and the people of small town America is what pulls at the heartstrings of audiences across the globe and made her original music such a success. 

Because for the small-town singer, who spent years behind the wheel of her Chevy, navigating the highways and interstates from the ranch to Chicago, Fargo to Fort Worth and everywhere in between, it's always been about the stories of the human condition and the isolated landscape of her home.

Today Veeder’s home is all but isolated. The buttes and creeks of her family’s ranch and the town where she grew up sits on top of one of the country’s largest oil reserves, and Western North Dakota, Veeder’s home, has found itself in the middle of one of the biggest economic booms the country has seen.

After the release of Jessie Veeder Live 2010an album recorded with her father’s hometown band, Veeder moved home to her family’s ranch to live and write about the changing life there and to make music with the people who have influenced her from the beginning.

Veeder’s 2012 release Nothing’s Forever 2012 is a 13-song anthem rooted in the acoustic guitars, dobro, steele, and bass work of local musicians and backed by the poignant harmonica and harmonies of her father. The single Boomtown, an homage to the people working to make a living in oil country, has put Veeder in the spotlight as one of North Dakota's most important songwriters and storytellers.

Jessie's most recent project, Northern Lights 2015, is a Nashville album that has been defined as "Americana Magic," and some of Jessie's best work yet.  Backed by some of the best players in the industry, Jessie's skill as a heart wrenching songwriter soars. Jessie is currently touring on behalf of Northern Lights and is continuing work on the family ranch and as a weekly columnist for statewide newspapers. She recently became a mother to a daughter born in November 2015 and is busy raising her in the house she built with her husband on her family's ranch. Their daughter, Edith, is the 5th generation to be raised on the 100+ year old Veeder homestead. 

Jessie is currently available for booking for concerts and presentations. 


Read about her life on her blog Meanwhile, back at the ranch...


 

 

 

Sounds like dirt roads and dust, wind and wheat fields, hope and home...[url]http://www.jessieveedermusic.com/[/url]
 
"Jessie is one of the most intuitive and instinctual artists I have ever worked with. She’s prolific. And her songs are great.”
 
-David Swenson, Makoche Studios
 
Jessie Veeder, 29, has been a symbol of folk music in the badlands of Western North Dakota since she released her first original album, "This Road," when she was only sixteen years old. It was an effort that sparked the interest of music enthusiasts and took her from performing at fairs and festivals around her home state to managing a national college and coffeehouse tour with a booking agency out of Nashville.
 
With unique and interestingly beautiful vocals, Veeder’s lyrics swell with references to her own life experiences growing up on a working cattle ranch in the rugged land of Western North Dakota. Veeder’s ability to captivate audiences with stories of her love for the landscape, the culture and the people of small town America is what pulls at the heartstrings of audiences across the globe and made her 2005 release “A Place to Belong” a success.
 “A Place to Belong” put the small-town singer behind the wheel of her Chevy, navigating the highways and interstates from the ranch to Chicago, Fargo to Fort Worth and everywhere in between singing the stories of the people and the isolated landscape of her home. 
 
Today Veeder’s home is all but isolated. The buttes and creeks of her family’s ranch and the town where she grew up sits on top of one of the country’s largest oil reserves, and Western North Dakota,  Veeder’s home, has found itself in the middle of one of the biggest economic booms the country has seen.
 
After the release of “Jessie Veeder Live” an album recorded with her father’s hometown band, Veeder moved home to her family’s ranch to live and write about the changing life there and to make music with the people who have influenced her from the beginning.
 
Veeder’s latest release “Nothing’s Forever” is a 13-song anthem rooted in the acoustic guitars, dobro, steele, and bass work of local musicians and backed by the poignant harmonica and harmonies of her father. The single “Boomtown,” an homage to the people working to make a living in oil country, has put Veeder in the spotlight as a feature in various news programs and national and international documentaries.
 
But beyond the music it’s Veeder’s story that has gained her a global following. Her popular website “Meanwhile, back at the ranch…” chronicles life on the Veeder Ranch and the success of her website has landed her a job as a weekly columnist in the Fargo Forum and as a commentator on Prairie Public Radio.
 
“Jessie tells the story of us,” said David Swenson of Makoche Studios out of Bismarck who worked with Jessie to produce an album that he describes as one of the best to come out of their studio. “Jessie is one of the most intuitive and instinctual artists I have ever worked with. She’s prolific. And her songs are great.” "Jessie is one of the most intuitive and instinctual artists I have ever worked with. She’s prolific. And her songs are great.” -David Swenson, Makoche Studios Jessie Veeder, 29, has been a symbol of folk music in the badlands of Western North Dakota since she released her first original album, "This Road," when she was only sixteen years old. It was an effort that sparked the interest of music enthusiasts and took her from performing at fairs and festivals around her home state to managing a national college and coffeehouse tour with a booking agency out of Nashville. With unique and interestingly beautiful vocals, Veeder’s lyrics swell with references to her own life experiences growing up on a working cattle ranch in the rugged land of Western North Dakota. Veeder’s ability to captivate audiences with stories of her love for the landscape, the culture and the people of small town America is what pulls at the heartstrings of audiences across the globe and made her 2005 release “A Place to Belong” a success.
 “A Place to Belong” put the small-town singer behind the wheel of her Chevy, navigating the highways and interstates from the ranch to Chicago, Fargo to Fort Worth and everywhere in between singing the stories of the people and the isolated landscape of her home.  Today Veeder’s home is all but isolated. The buttes and creeks of her family’s ranch and the town where she grew up sits on top of one of the country’s largest oil reserves, and Western North Dakota,  Veeder’s home, has found itself in the middle of one of the biggest economic booms the country has seen. After the release of “Jessie Veeder Live” an album recorded with her father’s hometown band, Veeder moved home to her family’s ranch to live and write about the changing life there and to make music with the people who have influenced her from the beginning. Veeder’s latest release “Nothing’s Forever” is a 13-song anthem rooted in the acoustic guitars, dobro, steele, and bass work of local musicians and backed by the poignant harmonica and harmonies of her father. The single “Boomtown,” an homage to the people working to make a living in oil country, has put Veeder in the spotlight as a feature in various news programs and national and international documentaries. But beyond the music it’s Veeder’s story that has gained her a global following. Her popular website “Meanwhile, back at the ranch…” chronicles life on the Veeder Ranch and the success of her website has landed her a job as a weekly columnist in the Fargo Forum and as a commentator on Prairie Public Radio. “Jessie tells the story of us,” said David Swenson of Makoche Studios out of Bismarck who worked with Jessie to produce an album that he describes as one of the best to come out of their studio. “Jessie is one of the most intuitive and instinctual artists I have ever worked with. She’s prolific. And her songs are great.”

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2016 and 2017 North Dakota's Favorite Folk Artist

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